Do You Think Bipartisanship is Overrated?

As in all my open threads, the floor is yours in order to make or break the case whether bipartisanship is just a thing of the past or is it the fad of the moment by virtue of the 2008 elections. Historical examples needed, if necessary.

Just remember, no hate speech, personal attacks or spam. Passionate and enlightened discussion is always welcome.

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3 Responses to “Do You Think Bipartisanship is Overrated?”

  1. talesinthesun Says:

    Why is there bipartisanism? I do not get the concept at all. To me, if a person puts a bill before the house or senate, the bill should be voted on with the right intention in mind rather than who wrote and sponsored bill. You can watch CSpan and see the voting and tell which party wrote the bill by the percentages. All too often these elcted officials will have a press conference with what looks like a gang behind them. Then the opposite party will refute all that was said with the same type gang. These are adults voting or at least I think they are adults.
    Another thing along the same lines is at the voting booth. A lady was interviewed this year that had voted 40 straight years so 10 elections. She always voted republican. So she was saying there has not been one Democrat that in her eyes was better. Or is it we are no better than elected officials and only vote our parties as well.

  2. Ceci Says:

    talesinthesun Says:

    Why is there bipartisanism? I do not get the concept at all. To me, if a person puts a bill before the house or senate, the bill should be voted on with the right intention in mind rather than who wrote and sponsored bill.

    In the conversations I’ve had about this subject, it has been argued that bipartisanism is optimal because it allows for both parties to work together. I tend to disagree with this idea because there is a lot of hypocrisy involved–especially when some politicians operate on their party’s interests first over that of their country.

    I would hope that at least some of the politicians in Congress would serve their constituents and the rest of the U.S. citizenry with a dash of altruism. But, then you see cases like that of Representative Strom Thurmond and his 24-hour filibuster against the passage of The Civil Rights Act. It is that act, among many others (like the time Rep. John Conyers was relegated to a basement to hold a hearing on the Downing Street Memos) that tells you that bipartisanism is one for the birds.

    You can watch CSpan and see the voting and tell which party wrote the bill by the percentages. All too often these elcted officials will have a press conference with what looks like a gang behind them. Then the opposite party will refute all that was said with the same type gang. These are adults voting or at least I think they are adults.

    The news showing the GOP’s resistance to the passage of the auto bailout bill in the Senate is the latest of a long line of partisan hijinks in front of the public eye. As I mentioned before, there are just some issues that require a politician to put the needs of the people first and one’s party second. And such petty behavior in a dire time like this one shows how shallow and far removed a politician is from what needs to be done for the country.

    So, yes, I agree with you. And I also believe it is quite amazing sometimes when things do get done in Washington. When done, the effect is quite powerful.

    Another thing along the same lines is at the voting booth. A lady was interviewed this year that had voted 40 straight years so 10 elections. She always voted republican. So she was saying there has not been one Democrat that in her eyes was better. Or is it we are no better than elected officials and only vote our parties as well.

    My take on this is that sometimes, we vote the way we are raised. There is a caveat to that though: because the media and current events have been so pervasive in our lives (especially when communicating on-line), I believe that information can either persuade or dissuade us from taking certain positions. That eventually might lead to a change in political affiliations. Thanks to sites like You Tube, clips from certain aspects of present day history can be shown so that people who have access to the Internet can see for themselves how a recent historical event played out without anyone telling them what to think.

    So, the accessibility to information plays an important part in changing one’s mind about political influences–even when being immersed within a family who has been traditionally partisan in nature. If there are ever studies in this area, it would be rather interesting to see how deep the influence of the Internet goes in changing the political affiliations of web surfers due to being able to peruse a plethora of information on-line regarding the issues of the day.

  3. The Economy » Blog Archive » George Bush Will Be Moving Into a Whites Only Neighborhood! At Says:

    […] Do You Think Bipartisanship is Overrated? « The Political Megaphone […]

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