As A New Administration Arrives, The Iraq War Must Be Dealt With Differently

There’s one thing you’ve got to learn about history: as one era ends, another comes up to teach a given society about the grave lessons they must learn. America, during this time, is in the midst of a struggle. It has to shake off its past built from the foundation of American Exceptionalism. The United States must embrace a future that teaches its citizens that they are one among many internationally in various capacities.

With that being said, we have such a long way to go to rebuild the good will and alliances that have been cast away as a result of the 43rd Presidency and its allies. On September 11th, 2001, the empathy and connection the world gave us was cheapened with the invasion of a country which posed no threat in terms of the War on Terror. Sadly enough, “shock and awe” was an event that signified what the priorities were in dealing with the destiny and eventual fate of this troubled conflict.

The problem of the Bush Administration, is that it followed too closely the PNAC-style approach of building an empire by using the idea of spreading democracy as a shield. To even subscribe to the notion that a occupied country might change its entire system to that of the occupier seems rather obtuse and heavy-handed in a world that does not need any more examples of force to change the tide of history. Forcing one’s way in to another country based on a “preemptive threat”, only amounts to no good–if you use both Afghanistan and Iraq as a model. Therefore, the Bush Doctrine only reflects a disastrous policy indicative of an equally dark age in American events.

That is why it is hoped that President Obama uses his National Security team to effectively deal with this issue and pave the way towards more diplomatic and peaceful solutions. The dangers of the world cannot handle any more swagger, arrogance and saber rattling in times that the economy unwittingly binds us all together regardless of borders. We need intelligent, thoughtful solutions that would leave force and war as virtually the last answer in the ever-changing and complex global society.

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6 Responses to “As A New Administration Arrives, The Iraq War Must Be Dealt With Differently”

  1. Jim Lunsford Says:

    Unfortunately, I don’t believe our policy is going to change overseas in this regard. As both Ron Paul and George Wallace are both on record of saying, there is no difference in the two parties. I actually heard George Wallace saying “There ain’t a nickel’s worth of difference between the” two parties. I couldn’t remember the exact quote, so I decided to cut the quote where I did. Ron Paul used terms like homogenous, but I always felt George hit the nail as square as it could be hit.
    These policies are not accidental, and our constant state of war can be traced back to the beginnings of the establishment of the Federal Reserve. I don’t believe we will have peace, liberty, or justice until this organization is disbanded, and it’s members prosecuted for treason. Thank you so much for your kind comments. I wish I could write half as eloquently as you, Jim

  2. Jim Lunsford Says:

    Ceci, I am writing you to ask you and anyone else you can think of to join me in the discussion section of http://change.gov. There is a healthy debate going on right now in which minds like ours can make a difference. I have been working my way through the threads, and am now on page 26. I am finding many people share our beliefs in the general sense and are growing increasingly frustrated with our governments inability to quit attempting to destroy our lives. Thank you so very much, your literary skills are needed in this truly revolutionary moment. Your friend, and comrade in ideas, Jim

  3. Ceci Says:

    Jim,

    Let me first apologize for not answering your messages sooner. It’s been hectic due to the holidays. 😦 Time seems to be of the essence when getting things together. So, finally, there’s a quiet moment in order to get my thoughts together not only to write; but to answer on-line friends about various issues. So, I thank you very much for your patience.

    Jim Lunsford Says:

    Unfortunately, I don’t believe our policy is going to change overseas in this regard. As both Ron Paul and George Wallace are both on record of saying, there is no difference in the two parties. I actually heard George Wallace saying “There ain’t a nickel’s worth of difference between the” two parties. I couldn’t remember the exact quote, so I decided to cut the quote where I did. Ron Paul used terms like homogenous, but I always felt George hit the nail as square as it could be hit.

    Although both Ron Paul and George Wallace each have their unique approaches to politics and history (some of it not so good), I feel that I will have to disagree with your point about the Dems and the Republicans being the same.

    My reasons are as follows:

    1)The modern incarnation of the Republicans has a shoddy record on civil rights issues on all fronts. This is especially so when the “Dixiecrats” (which Strom Thurmond and George Wallace were a part) were absorbed into the party due to their stand against civil rights. The conservatives have not been traditionally progressive when it comes to people of color, women, gays or other groups that have had their rights historically and presently subverted by the state.

    2) Although I agree that the DLC and center-right Dems are more corporatist than the majority of their colleagues, the modern Democratic party has traditionally campaigned on the rights of working class folks and their needs. Reagan made it a point to start the long battle against the working class and the unions. Therefore, the Republicans have always been for Big Business. And the entire bailout issue shows it too. So, unless there are Republicans who are suddenly populist on the behalf of the unions and their needs, then I’ll have to beg to differ on this stand as well.

    3)Republicans are notoriously authoritarian in their stances. Since they see issues in a black/white mentality which often borders upon extreme stances on the issues of the day, their attitude for little to no debate centers upon how their party runs in lockstep. Democrats are a big tent in which debate is guided upon how they make their policy. Because people are allowed to share their mind (despite the corralling efforts of DLC and center-right Dems), there is always room for passionate argument and moralistic reasoning when appropriate.

    There are more reasons where this comes from, but the question of the moment is whether policy in Iraq is going to change or not. I feel with Mr. Obama’s pick of hawks, it has the potential not to. However, I believe that they have to do it, or face the consequences down the road of a waste of international good will and a whole host of negative repercussions which draw upon the fate of both Afghanistan and Iraq. So, Obama must use his brilliance to see beyond his “team of rivals” and work carefully. Even he must realize that Bush’s current policy has been disastrous for America as well as the world when it comes to the Iraq War.

    Jim Lunsford Says:

    These policies are not accidental, and our constant state of war can be traced back to the beginnings of the establishment of the Federal Reserve. I don’t believe we will have peace, liberty, or justice until this organization is disbanded, and it’s members prosecuted for treason.

    Although I do believe that the Federal Reserve plays its own part in American history, I tend to place my ideas on the fact that Bush followed the PNAC document in order to shape his attitudes and work dealing with the Middle East as a whole. This policy favors a “pax Americana” built upon conquest, disaster capitalism and social reengineering due to ideology, As a result, Bush and his cronies have made Iraq their own personally colony in which to not only plunder the country’s resources; but to also test to see if these ideas will ring true. So far, it has proved to be a disaster and has endangered the lives of Iraqi citizens as a result. Furthermore, it has messed up a lot of lives in the military as well. When the soldiers come home, we’ll have a lot of trouble on our hands due to the PTSD, injury and a whole host of other problems of being exposed to numerous tours of combat.

    That’s why we can’t continue the same policy as it is. There’s too much at stake to leave it in the hands of hawks.

    My prescription? Hold Mr. Obama’s feet to the fire about this issue. Unlike Bush, Mr. Obama has the potential of being reasoned with. As a result, we cannot waste this opportunity. We’ve eight years of what happens with a “dictator” in office who disregards not only the other branches of government, but the will of the people. 😦

    Thank you so much for your kind comments. I wish I could write half as eloquently as you, Jim.

    That is very kind of you to say. I do my best. 🙂 When reading your work, I’ve enjoyed your insights and find that you have your own voice of expression that needs to be heard.

    As I said to my other friend Karen who posts here as well as other folks who share the unique responsibility to discuss these events with aplomb, the new American age needs all of our voices. We cannot sit back and stay silent. We’ve got to continue to write what we feel as often as we can. All of our ideas are needed and welcomed in trying to change America in the future.

    For me? My passion for change and justice is a result of my eloquence. 🙂

    I wish you the best in your own work during this time. It is just as remarkably intelligent and wonderfully outspoken.

    Take care,

    Ceci

  4. Ceci Says:

    Part II of my message to Jim:

    Jim Lunsford Says:

    Ceci, I am writing you to ask you and anyone else you can think of to join me in the discussion section of http://change.gov. There is a healthy debate going on right now in which minds like ours can make a difference. I have been working my way through the threads, and am now on page 26. I am finding many people share our beliefs in the general sense and are growing increasingly frustrated with our governments inability to quit attempting to destroy our lives. Thank you so very much, your literary skills are needed in this truly revolutionary moment. Your friend, and comrade in ideas, Jim

    Jim,

    Thank you for the suggestion. I’ve been more of a lurker at Change.gov more often than not. I’ve read some of the comments and questions. The one that they have now in the “discussion” section is quite interesting, even though it now stretches to 60 pages. There are a lot of passionate voices over there–each with their own insights. However, the narrative lately has wrapped around the decision to have Rick Warren give the invocation at the Inaugural.

    If they are focusing on an issue that I am very interested in–especially if it has to do with policies that I’ve discussed or campaigned for in any capacity, it might be a possibility. 😀

    Again, I appreciate you giving me the heads up as well as your generous comments regarding my ideas and style. I am humbled to have someone think so kindly of my work. But in the same vein, your work reflects a power, deftness and importance of its own. And I look forward to whatever you say on the cusp of current events either here or on your own blog.

    It all comes down to the exchange of ideas along with the hope that they enlighten and educate in the face of a growing momentum of change. Here, our ideas can grow in a garden of possibility.

    Take care,

    Ceci

  5. Jim Lunsford Says:

    Thank you Ceci, for your patient and well-written response, however I would like to point out that even though the Rick Warren issue seems to dominate the bulletin, there are many other issues being discussed as well. It does take patience to wade through it all, but I believe it an excellent opportunity to make a real difference for change.
    As for the Bush, or Obama approach, there is only the appearance of difference. Presidents do not rule this country, bankers rule it. Woodrow Wilson, Eisenhower, and JFK all said the same, albeit in cryptic messages. I personally believe the best political commentary I’ve ever heard was on the George Carlin video on You Tube, “You have no rights”.
    There are the differences you spoke of in the dixiecrats and all that, and I do not argue that point. It is interesting to note however, that once George Wallace got shot, he changed his tune and was actually quite active for his entire constituency, not just the whites. He was a rare man though, to go from hate to compassion, and a hate that was the south of that time, an honest hate as Malcolm X would have said. To an honest compassion.
    However, politicians do as they are told, in the important laws. Unfortunately, we have not known (as a nation) who has been doing the telling until the internet came into it’s own. For now, both parties are the banker party, with only lip service to what they are supposed to stand for. Soon, the spectrum will shift once again. This internet has already effected more change in the past ten years (I count ten years because that was when it began it’s popularity with the emergence of internet porn. I know, but it’s true. In 1997 or so) than the printing press did in hundreds of years.
    But please, regardless of your position on issues, this is a real opportunity to affect change, and your voice is waiting to be heard. There are threads you can join. Thanks, Jim

  6. Ceci Says:

    Jim Lunsford Says:

    Thank you Ceci, for your patient and well-written response, however I would like to point out that even though the Rick Warren issue seems to dominate the bulletin, there are many other issues being discussed as well. It does take patience to wade through it all, but I believe it an excellent opportunity to make a real difference for change.

    You’re very welcome. 🙂

    I agree. I realize that there are a plethora of issues being discussed on Change.gov. that are challenging and thought-provoking. Due to the length of comments, it is also rather cumbersome to get through each message. But, as my grandmother said, nothing beats a failure but a try.

    Don’t worry. I keep my eye on Change.gov. It is a matter of picking my battles and finding the appropriate subject to discuss. By hook and by crook, the will be one thing that will get me to answer appropriately and persuasively. 🙂

    As for the Bush, or Obama approach, there is only the appearance of difference. Presidents do not rule this country, bankers rule it. Woodrow Wilson, Eisenhower, and JFK all said the same, albeit in cryptic messages. I personally believe the best political commentary I’ve ever heard was on the George Carlin video on You Tube, “You have no rights”.

    I am very familiar with Carlin’s take on politics. And, at times, I find him rather astute and succinct when it comes to describing how everyday people get left out of the process. His attacks on the political process are where it’s at as well.

    So when you look at the entire process with the electoral college in tow, I think that it is accurate to say that everyday people do have very little to do with the process by the way things are set up.

    However, I tend to believe that where people can affect the process is by voting and continually holding their politicians to the fire. By becoming a pain the derrieres of those who represent us, then our issues will get heard regardless. I also believe that if people relied less on just simply believing our politicians and thinking more, then it wouldn’t be business as usual as well. Carlin, in his politics, believed that as well.

    Because of how corporate influence has influenced some very big issues that Congress as well as the other branches of government have taken up, I agree that bankers do hold the cards. However, I also believe that how a presidency is run depends on whether that leader is a strong or weak figure. Time will tell if Obama how he will lead. But eight years of George Bush have taught us how a weak President could use the office to line the pockets of his friends. As a result, everyday Americans are getting screwed from all that paying court to Bush’s corporate suitors. And now, we are seeing the detriment that is happening to the infrastructure of the United States when the corporations get all the money.

    That’s why I had hoped that instead of Lincoln, Obama might have been taking his lessons from FDR–especially because it is primer of what and what not to do in dire economic times. Despite his choices to head his economic policy, Mr. Obama will have to realize that eventually he answers to the everyday people who helped fund him and put him into office.

    So, I’ll be very interested in what Obama does. And, I do agree with you that we have a change to persuade him (if there are enough of us) to think about the implications of his decisions if they are drastic.

    I truly believe that this time must impel people to fight for their future in America. If we leave it to the corporations, we’ll all be in breadlines.

    There are the differences you spoke of in the dixiecrats and all that, and I do not argue that point. It is interesting to note however, that once George Wallace got shot, he changed his tune and was actually quite active for his entire constituency, not just the whites. He was a rare man though, to go from hate to compassion, and a hate that was the south of that time, an honest hate as Malcolm X would have said. To an honest compassion.

    I realize that. And in conversations about race and the past, I’ve discussed this issue with others who have felt the same way. Redemption and change is a powerful thing. But, George Wallace (as well as Strom Thurmond, Jesse Helms and the rest of their ilk) left an ugly stain on the livelihoods and lives of a lot of folks of color. Some of these legacies of hate last even to this day. And to think that Wallace manipulated the system to get into politics and benefited from a society of hate, it is rather hard to believe that this man had changed his spots at the end. His compassion was too little, too late for a lot of people. And there are some of us who have long memories of what Wallace represented in a society of segregation, repression and animus.

    I understand what you are trying to say. But, respectfully, we’ll agree to disagree there.

    However, politicians do as they are told, in the important laws. Unfortunately, we have not known (as a nation) who has been doing the telling until the internet came into it’s own. For now, both parties are the banker party, with only lip service to what they are supposed to stand for. Soon, the spectrum will shift once again. This internet has already effected more change in the past ten years (I count ten years because that was when it began it’s popularity with the emergence of internet porn. I know, but it’s true. In 1997 or so) than the printing press did in hundreds of years.

    I can attest to that. The Internet has been a vast storehouse of knowledge in which everyday folks can educate themselves on all aspects of information. It is a valuable resource that helps the populace become more educated about what their politicians do as well as what are the vital issues of the day. So, more than ever before, the American people has the ammunition to hold our officials’ feet to the fire.

    As for both parties being the “bankers party”, it would be accurate to say that money does dictate what certain politicians do. That’s why it behooves the American citizenry to work toward promoting representatives who will work for their best interests and not that of the corporation. Because we have access to more information that we’ve ever had before, we have a chance to turn the tables and fight for leadership who will help us for a change. What the election of 2008 did was teach a whole lot of us that we deserve more in our leadership. Therefore, fighting for quality people is the order of the day.

    Let’s hope that this becomes a reality.

    But please, regardless of your position on issues, this is a real opportunity to affect change, and your voice is waiting to be heard. There are threads you can join. Thanks, Jim

    Again, I thank you for alerting me to latest on the Change.gov discussion area. As I said before, I will try to insert myself into the conversations over there when I can. For myself, there will be a time and place where I can be part of the conversation. I will do my best to give my two cents whereever it is needed. I understand very well the gravity of these times and why not any of us can afford to stay silent. 🙂

    Well wishes on your endeavors at this time. And as always, thank you for responding so forthrightly and frankly on these issues. In this age, we desperately need it.

    Take care,

    Ceci

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